Interior Designer Behind Mandarin Oriental Paris On Keeping Creativity Alive

Homes

August 18, 2017 | BY Tan Xi Voon

Also revealed: her latest furniture collaboration with Pouenat we are obsessed with

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Photo credit: Sybille de Margerie Interiors

It is safe to describe Sybille de Margerie as an interior design powerhouse.

After all, her eponymous design practice has been the choice of some of the world’s leading hoteliers, luxury developers and, most recently, French artisanal brand Pouenat.

Mandarin Oriental Paris and Cheval Blanc Courchevel are two of the many impressive names you will find in her portfolio. But no matter what the project, Sybille makes sure to present each with a charming character or individuality, taking cue from relevant history, culture and tatler_tatler_stories.

Malaysia Tatler caught up with Sybille to learn more about her inspiration and newest design creations.

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Mandarin Oriental Paris | Photo credit: Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group

As a designer, how do you keep your creativity going?

Travelling, as I do most of the year for my projects, is a great source of inspiration. Art exhibitions are another refreshing way of keeping a creative mindset. But, most importantly, stay curious.

What are you currently interested in and how is it feeding into your designs?

Architecture, paintings and photography. All these disciplines exercise one’s eyes in terms of light, perspective and textures.

ALSO READ: Instagram accounts all art lovers need to follow

Have you always known that you will end up in the designing field?

For a long time, my family owned the Hotel de Crillon, one of the most beautiful places in Paris. I therefore had the privilege of growing up in an atmosphere of a place that places an utmost importance on traditions, the finest service and savoir-faire. When I chose to become an interior designer, I recalled the sense of wonder I had felt so early in life and set out to recreate it. My goal is to achieve a perfect blend of tradition, innovation and creativity. I see my work as a sensual quest for comfort, and the pleasure of the finest quality in the smallest detail.

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Cheval Blanc Courchevel | Photo credit: Cheval Blanc Courchevel

Tell us about the furniture collection you designed for Pouenat.

The creation of furniture and lighting collections, combining modernity and tradition, luxury and elegance, is part of the creative direction of our studio and its international projects. My taste for noble materials, mixed with my sense of detail inspired me. The collection hinges on five themes mixing emotion, imagination and sensuality, taking in consideration of both functional aspects as well as market needs.

Which is your favourite piece from the collection?

My favourite piece is the Fusion console and dining table. A dining table almost always looks empty and I was looking to provide a central piece as a sculpture that would make a statement by itself even when the table is not set. During a dining experience, the sculpture also serves as a table runner where dishes, candles or flowers can be placed.

What is next for you?

We are currently working on The Royal Atlantis Residences in Dubai, in which we were to design the interior of 230 apartments and penthouses. A few hotels are also in progress: Cheval Blanc in Oman, Park Hyatt in Marrakech, Hilton in Taghazout, Hotel D in Geneva to mention a few.

Below, take a closer look at Sybille's high-impact design for Pouenat and pick your favourite.


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Pouenat Fusion dining table


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 Pouenat Fusion console


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 Pouenat Ilot coffee table


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Pouenat Passage coffee table


Photos courtesy of Pouenat.

Looking for more statement-making pieces? We love these.

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